Le Roy Central School District   

Technology Plan

 

2001-2005


 

 

 


Le Roy Central School District

Technology Plan

2001-2005

 

 

Table of Contents. i

 

 

Chapter 1: Introduction. 1

Chapter 2: Technology Use. 3

Section 2.1 Descriptions of Core Capabilities. 3

Section 2.2 Faculty and Staff Use. 8

Subsection 2.2.1 Current State. 8

Subsection 2.2.2 Desired State. 9

Subsection 2.2.3 Assessment: 10

Section 2.3 Student Use. 10

Subsection 2.3.1 Current State. 10

Subsection 2.3.2 Desired State. 11

Section 2.4 Noninstructional Staff Use. 13

Section 2.4.1 Current State. 13

Section 2.4.2 Desired State: 14

Chapter 3: Professional Development 15

Section 3.1 Staff Development Opportunities. 15

Subsection 3.1.1 Current State. 15

Subsection 3.1.2 Desired State: 17

Subsection 3.1.3 Assessment 18

Chapter 4: Infrastructure and Inventory. 21

Section 4.1 Infrastructure. 21

Subsection 4.1.1 Current State. 21

Subsection 4.1.2 Desired State. 21

Section 4.2  Hardware, Software, & Peripherals. 21

Subsection 4.2.1 Standardization Strategy. 21

Subsection 4.2.2 Hardware & Peripherals, Current State. 22

Subsection 4.2.3 Hardware & Peripherals, Desired State. 23

Subsection 4.2.4 Software, Current State. 24

Subsection 4.2.5 Software, Desired State. 25

Chapter 5: Acquisition. 26

Section 5.1 Acquisition Strategy. 26

Section 5.2 Budget 27

Appendices. 28

 

 


Chapter 1: Introduction

The Le Roy Central School District is, as stated in its Mission Statement, “Committed to providing the most effective teaching/learning environment for the success of all students.”  Towards that goal, the District prepared its first Technology Plan in 1993, revised the plan in 1996, and then again in the spring of 2000.

In the latest revision the plan was updated to reflect the technological emphases at the time.  Specifically, the focus was drawn away from hardware acquisition and infrastructure to planning for the integration of the technology into the learning environment.  At that time, the following assumptions were used to frame that document:

·        Technology is a reality in our society and our students must be prepared to use it

·        Technology can be extremely useful in supporting student learning, assisting teachers in daily tasks, and encouraging professional development

·        Teachers who enjoy mastery of technology use it

·        If teachers don't use technology, their students will not either

·        Technology that is stable, robust, and working is more likely to be used

·        Teachers naturally work in teams

·        Staff turnover is inevitable

·        Technology purchases should be linked to actual teacher plans rather than fitting plans to technology purchases

 

The purpose of a technology plan is to guide the decision-making processes involved with the use of technology in the educational system, as a facilitator to learning and teacher productivity as well as a utility to aid in the overall management needs of the district. The plan should direct the infusion and acquisition of the various technologies that are currently available as well as those not yet imagined.  While directing however, it should not constrict the decisions and practices of the practitioners in the classrooms and offices throughout the district.  Because of the constantly changing nature of the use of technology, it is again necessary to update the district plan so as to reemphasize the use of technology in the learning environment as well as confront some of the additional issues that have begun to arise.  Specifically, the current plan attempts to address the following considerations:

  1. The use of technology to improve the overall educational environment for all students at LCSD
  2. The professional development strategies necessary to carry out the improvement of the educational environment
  3. The assessment of both the use of technology and the professional development plan so as to assure congruency with the curricular goals and objectives of the LCSD
  4. A description of the current hardware and infrastructure as well as proposed acquisition necessary to carry out such a plan.

 

The district mission statement and technology vision statement serve as the overarching guides for the creation and implementation of this plan. 

Le Roy Central School Mission Statement:

“Le Roy Central Schools:  Committed to providing the most effective teaching/learning environment for the success of all students.”

 

Technology Vision Statement:


“To use technology within the School/Community to provide the most effective teaching/learning environment for the success of all learners and to encourage life long learning.”

 

 

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Chapter 2: Technology Use

The district's vision of teaching and learning is the driving force behind technology use in this district.  It is the belief of the employees of this district that technology can be used to prepare students for the world beyond our four walls. 

There is a fundamental backbone of technology necessary to support all technology applications.  This basic infrastructure represents the foundation upon which all future technology will be built.  This technology structure should accommodate expected future expansions, maintain appropriate speeds and allow for acceptable linking with other systems.

There are eight core capabilities of technology that an educational institution should provide.  The degree to which these capabilities are available should be addressed as a preferred future. Some need to be available all the time as needed, while others may only be needed occasionally.

 

Core Capabilities:

 

1.      Authoring/Publishing

2.      Presentation/Multimedia Authoring

3.      Simulation Technologies

4.      Organization

5.      Communication

6.      Research

7.      Graphic Design

8.      Programming

 

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Section 2.1 Descriptions of Core Capabilities

 

I. Authoring/Publishing

 

The use of a computer to produce word processed text is a core capability that every student should possess.  Text which is electronically generated is easier to compose, edit, and read.  Studies have shown that students are more motivated to complete their written work when it has a professional look.  Technology-assisted writing encourages composition without undue concentration on efforts to edit.  

 

A. District Standard:

 

Word Processing

The Microsoft Office Suite, including MS Word is the standard collection of office-type applications loaded on each machine in the district.  All efforts have been made to provide district employees and students with the most up-to-date versions of this software as well as assure compatibility between workstations.  Currently all machines carry either MS Office 97 or 2000.  In addition, computers in the HS Business lab also carry MS Works which can be used for basic word processing.

 

Desktop Publishing

In addition to MS Word, computers throughout the district have MS Publisher as the standard desktop publishing application.  Desktop publishing applications are slightly different than standard word processing programs as they allow greater functionality and customization of text and graphic elements for the creation of advanced published pieces (i.e. brochures, flyers, newsletters, etc).  In addition, some computers in the district also carry Pagemaker 6.5.  This is another desktop publishing application which allows for greater flexibility when composing written work.

 

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II. Presentation/Multimedia Authoring

 

Presentation software is a tool which can be used to create electronic presentations which include pictures, videos, sounds, and text.  Presentations such as this allow the author to communicate his/her message in the most effective way possible. 

 

A.     District Standard:

 

Powerpoint is the standard multimedia authoring program available on all district computers.  Hyperstudio is also available on many of the computers in the high school and plans are being made to purchase additional licenses for the computers in the elementary.

 

Projection Devices:

Projection devices are used for large screen presentations.  Presentations of this type are useful at meetings as well as to deliver instruction in the classroom.  The LCSD owns a variety of technologies which facilitate large screen projection and presentations.  Examples of these technologies include Infocus projectors, 32” monitors, LCD Panels, Smartboards, and Mimeo wands.  While not ubiquitous throughout the district, these devices are readily available for teacher use as needed.  Future purchases should include additional devices to meet increasing demand.

 

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III. Simulation Technologies

 

Simulations foster critical thinking and problem solving and help to promote a constructivist approach to teaching and learning.  When using this type of technology, students are afforded authentic experiences in specific settings. Typically, simulation technologies incorporate problem solving, decision-making, critical thinking, and the application of key skills which are being addressed in the classroom.  The activities may be multidisciplinary and reinforce concepts from numerous learning standards. 

 

The use of simulation technologies in instruction is sporadic across the district and there is no district standard at this time. Examples of this type of instruction has been noted in the following areas:

 

Example

Location

Online weather prediction

Earth Science

Simulated Fruit Fly

AP Biology

Environmental Awareness

6th grade science classes

Virtual field trips

5th grade Civil War, MS Spanish class

Economics simulations

Introduction to Occupations class, and Sr. HS Economics

 

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IV. Organization

 

Three specific types of software are available throughout the district to promote organizational skills: database software, spreadsheets, and graphic organizing software.  Each are used in conjunction with the instructional goals and objectives of a given department or area within the district. 

 

Databases allow the user to maintain and organize primarily text-based information.  Students can use this type of software in specific curricular areas to keep track of information as well as manipulate that information to glean the relationships which are inherent in the data.  Employees of the business office can use databases to track employee and financial information and administrative offices can use this type of application to maintain accurate student records. 

 

Spreadsheets are traditionally used to organize and maintain numerical information.  These applications also promote advanced calculation and graphing capabilities. 

 

Graphic organizing software encourages the user to depict relationships between concepts gleaned from reading or as a prewriting/planning tool.  This type of software offers an advantage over the traditional paper and pencil method as it facilitates manipulation of information as well as enables archiving of work. 

 

A. District Standard

 

Database Software

Database programs exist as part of the integrated packages found on each workstation.  MS Access is available through the MS Office Suite package and can be found on every district owned workstation.  MS Works, found on the workstations in the Business lab, also includes a database feature.  School Master is the district student information database which runs off of the network file server and is accessible from every workstation.  Part 200 is the district database and reporting system for the Special Education program and is accessible from specific user-defined workstations.  Finance Manager, a combined personnel database and accounting program is being used by the Business Office to manage the overall financial needs of the District.

 

Spreadsheet Software

Spreadsheet applications exist as part of the integrated packages found on each workstation.  MS Excel is available through the MS Office Suite package and can be found on every district owned workstation.  There is some availability of other spreadsheet programs for younger students.  In particular, The Graph Club is available on some elementary workstations although this application has not been identified as a district standard.

 

 

Graphic Organizing Software

MS Word offers limited functionality in creating graphic organizers.  Inspiration, a software application designed specifically for this purpose, was purchased in the 2000-2001 school year and is available for all instructional computers 3-12th grade.  Kidspiration, a similar graphic organizer application designed especially for the K-3 population, is available on the computers in the K-3 elementary classrooms.

 

Organizational Devices   

During the 2000-2001 school year, two Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) were purchased for use by the district superintendent and technology coordinator.  Devices such as these facilitate personal organization by providing the user with an integrated calendar, to-do list, memo system, and address book.  The successful use of these two devices prompted the purchase of additional PDAs for the 2001-2002 school year.  To date, the district owns forty Palm organizers which are being used in the following ways:

 

Personnel

Use

Administrative staff

Daily organization, accessing student schedules (HS VP), notetaking

2nd grade teachers

Organization and maintenance of math observations

K-12 staff

Various academic projects

ES PE staff

Record keeping and organization of observational data

 

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V. Communication

           

The ability to effectively communicate is a critical skill for all employees and students at Le Roy Central School.  This communication can be facilitated with the use of electronic mail (e-mail).  E-Mail is a convenient way to communicate with colleagues and parents. 

 

 

A. District Standard:

 

E-Mail accounts are provided to every member of the LCSD staff through Edutech.  Most e-mail can be accessed via the Internet, through the Edutech web site.  A few staff members carry out their e-mail activities with the use of MS Outlook.

 

 

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VI. Research

 

Research is a key element in lifelong learning and instruction and technology facilitates this instruction by offering an array of resources for up-to-date, valuable information.  Workstations located throughout the district are capable of promoting a variety of research activities.

 

A. District Standard:

 

1.      All computers have integrated CD-ROM drives.  This enables users to access information from available research CDs.  MS Encarta is the electronic encyclopedia supported by the District and is available on two computers in each of the computer labs as well as in the intermediate classrooms.

2.      All computers have access to the Internet which offers the user a plethora of sites for primary source information.

3.      All computers have access to the OPAC card catalog which contains all current library holdings.  Students may use any workstation to search for a particular title, author, or topic and determine which are currently available.

4.      The district subscribes to the SIRS Information Database and Worldbook Online.  SIRS is an online database which contains information about periodical holdings.  Worldbook Online is an online encyclopedia.  Both are available links off of the Library’s homepage and accessible through any district workstation as well as from any workstation, home or otherwise, with access to the Internet.

 

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VII. Graphic Design

 

Graphic design is an integral part of any desktop publishing or multimedia authoring project.  The ability to convey useful information through a graphical representation is a core capability which should be promoted among staff and students.

 

A. District Standard:

 

Photo Manipulation

MS Photo Editor is available on all district workstations.  This program allows for simple manipulation of digital images.  More advanced photo manipulation software is also available throughout the district.  Adobe Photoshop is located on the workstations in the HS CAD Lab.

 

Illustration

Adobe Illustrator is located on the computers in the CAD Lab and can be used by students to create original works of digital art.

 

Computer Aided Design

AutoCad is used by students in the CAD classes to design original structures.

 

 

Image Capturing Devices

The ability to bring an image into the computer so that it can be manipulated can be accomplished in two ways.  First, scanners are located in both computer labs, the HS English and business lab, the CAD lab, and in a sixth grade classroom.  Scanners are used to capture both two and three dimensional objects.  Digital cameras, both still and video, are available throughout the district for teacher and student use. 

 

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VIII. Programming

 

Computer programming is a potential career choice today.  Currently, there are not opportunities for LCSD students to learn this skill.

 

Section 2.2 Faculty and Staff Use

 

Subsection 2.2.1 Historical Information (1999-2001)

·        A survey, entitled the Reality Based Technology Planning survey, was administered in the spring of 2000 and required the teachers to respond to a series of statements focusing on their use, attitude, and skill regarding technology.  A total of 79 teachers responded to this survey. (See Appendix A. for a complete description of the Reality Based Technology Planning (RBTP) model.)  After completing the survey, results were compiled and teams of teachers were categorized according to their level of use.  The average district score fell into the "Accomplished User" range indicating that the typical LCSD teacher uses more than one software package with ease as well as assists students in the use of technology.  Additionally, it was noted that this level of user was beginning to use technology to reinforce his/her lessons.

·        The second survey, administered in the fall of 2000, required the teachers to respond to a series of questions regarding their use of and feelings toward technology.  This survey was made available to the district through a partnership between Edutech and the University of Michigan Center for Research and Technology.  The survey was made available through an online format.  A total of 92 faculty members and staff responded to this survey.  Results for the entire BOCES district indicate that progress is being made towards having students use computers and the Internet.  From the survey responses the authors found that 55% of the teachers had students use computers for curricular activities at least once/week and that 33% had students use the Internet at least once/week.  In addition, 67% of the teachers reported that they felt that the Internet had a positive impact on their students’ learning and that students were more motivated to learn when they used the Internet.   

 

 

 

Subsection 2.2.2 Current State (SY2002-2003)

 

The majority of staff members of the LCSD have a working knowledge of the computer.  Many use this tool for utilitarian purposes, i.e. grade calculation, typed communications, gathering information from the Internet, and using e-mail.  In the Spring of 2001, a third survey was distributed to the staff. This survey was developed using the text, Grappling with Accountability, by Bernjean Porter, and administered via the district web site.  A summary of the results of that survey were presented to the Technology Committee and Board of Education shortly after its administration and are included in the appendix of this document.  Overall, results indicated that that use of the Internet and word processing are the two primary uses for technology, districtwide.  With regards to Internet use, over half of the respondents at both the Jr/Sr HS and Elementary school considered themselves to be either confident or capable of teaching others (75% Jr/SrHS, 66%, ES).   In the area of word processing, 67% of the Jr/Sr HS teachers and 81% of the ES teachers considered themselves to be either confident or capable of teaching others.  This trend was also evident in the ” Other” category with 82% of the respondents ranking themselves high.  The third highest use/proficiency was in the category of e-mail use.  Sixty-seven percent of both the Jr/Sr. HS and ES teachers considered themselves to be confident or capable of teaching others. 

 

The use of spreadsheets was higher in the Jr/Sr HS than in the ES.  This is possibly due to the fact that many of the secondary teachers use spreadsheets for grade calculation. Another area found to be higher at the secondary level was in the use of desktop publishing. 

 

In the area of network use, the skill level across all proficiency levels seemed somewhat equal.  This indicates that most teachers have basic knowledge of storing and retrieving files, but lack confidence in more extensive network capabilities.

 

Subsection 2.2.3 Desired State

            Five-Year Goal: In order for technology to benefit all students, it must be used across all grade and curricular areas.  To accomplish this, teachers must possess both the knowledge and skills to use an assortment of technologies within their instruction.  Each member of the LCSD staff must therefore be functioning at either “Confident” or “Capable of Teaching Others” level of proficiency as described in the most recently administered survey.  This means that staff members must be able to use technologies in a large percentage of lessons.  They must have knowledge of the basic equipment as well as actively pursue new knowledge about emerging technologies.  To attain these levels, teachers must be provided with a wide range of training opportunities as well as be supported with assistance and appropriate equipment.  (A complete description of the staff development plan follows later in this plan.) 

           

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SY2002-2003 Activities:

¨        Investigate ways in which technology can be used to accomplish daily tasks.  Provide a mechanism for the communication of instructional needs and their potential alignment to technological use.

¨        Develop a system for, and train teachers to utilize data in their instructional decision-making.

¨        Align technology goals and benchmarks to NYS Standards and current instructional initiatives.

¨        Provide a variety of training opportunities which are congruent with current instructional initiatives.

¨        Investigate availability and feasibility of providing online staff development opportunities.

¨        Provide a mechanism for sharing exemplary practices among faculty and staff.

 

Subsection 2.2.4 Assessment:

The determination of the level of staff competency/use of technology will be facilitated with the use of survey which was developed during the 2001-2002 school year.  Data from this survey will be compiled and compared against results from the previous years. 

In addition, records will be kept regarding individual staff training and workshop attendance.  Data from this activity will be used as a determiner for increased staff proficiency.  

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Section 2.3 Student Use

Subsection 2.3.1 Historical Information (2000-2001)

During the 2000-2001 school year, plans are underway to address this limitation to the LCSD technology program.  Currently, the technology committee is working to create technology standards and objectives for the entire school district.  It is anticipated that a rough draft of this plan will be completed by the end of the 2000-2001 school year, with implementation to begin during the following school year.  In addition to technology goals for each grade level, exemplary practices within each construct will also be identified.  These exemplary instances of technology integration will be included in the document as well as be made available on the district web site. Plans are currently underway to create a section on the district web site which will highlight exemplary technology implementation practices.

 

Timeline:

Step No.

Task Involved in Achieving Objective

Persons Responsible

Start Date

End Date

1.

Development of common language and underlying principles for technology use.

Combined Technology committee

March 2001

April 2001

2.

Write objectives appropriate for each grade level.

Individual building tech. Committees

April 2001

 

3.

CompleteReview by grade level/department teams.  Revise as needed.

Individual building tech. Committees

May 2001

June 2001

4.

Raise faculty awareness.  Work by technology committee to identify exemplars to individual objectives. 

Combined technology committee.

September 2001

 

November 2001 Revised: March 2002

5.

Develop strategy to monitor and assess developing student technology competencies.

 

Combined technology committee.

November 2001

 

January 2002 Revised: February, 2002

 

 

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Subsection 2.3.2 Current State

 

The following description of the current state of technology use by students was gleaned from the survey results discussed previously.   Overwhelmingly, respondents reported that students usually worked individually when using technology. 

 

When asked what changes technology had supported, the following responses rated the highest:

 

Within this construct, the highest average was found in the area of using word processing, spreadsheets, and databases although the individual levels of student use did not coincide with the individual skill levels of the teachers.  Of exception however was the use of word processors at the Jr/Sr HS in the high use category.  Forty-one percent of the respondents indicated that their students used this technology daily/weekly.  This same pattern was not observed at the ES, where only eight percent of the respondents indicated daily/weekly use.  This is to be expected when one considers that keyboarding is introduced in the elementary school at the third grade level and students at the intermediate level are still developing this skill.

 

The only other regular use of technology by students was evident at the ES at both the primary and intermediate levels in the area of Providing Alternate Activities.  This finding is probably due to the workstation availability at the elementary school where there are five workstations located in each classroom.   In addition, elementary classrooms typically use a learning center approach to reinforce instruction.

 

No other area in the construct of Student Use resulted in an average equal to or above two.  Overall analysis of the results indicates that there is no consistent use of technology within any area, with the possible exception of word processing.  This finding supports observational data in that, while technology use is apparent as one travels through the corridors, there is no consistent use within or across grade levels and/or departments.

At the secondary level, students take specific courses designed to increase their competencies with computer use.  The LCSD course offerings include a variety of technology/computer related courses.

Course

Grade

Description

BA/BCA

11-12

Reinforces concepts/skills learned in eighth grade Introduction to Computers class.

Computer Applications

11-12

 

Introduction to Computers.

8

Includes introduction into the basic functions of a computer: word processing, spreadsheet and database use, keyboarding.

Accounting

11-12

Principles and application of accounting.

Business Law

11-12

Introduction into the basic concepts of business law.  Includes Internet searching and keyboarding.

Keyboarding

9

Develop proficiency with keyboarding.

Introduction to Occupations

10

Introduces students to a variety of occupations and reviews skills/knowledge needed.  Use of computers to simulate real life working situations.

Technology

10-12

Introduction to the principles of computer-aided design.

Graphic Arts/Communications

10-12

Introduction to the principles of computer assisted graphic design.

Technology

7-8

Introduction to the basics of design and modeling. 

Home and Careers

8

Exploration of careers using various applications and Internet sites.

 

                Subsection 2.3.3 Desired State

 

Five-Year Goal: Society values productive citizenry.  In order to be a productive, contributing member of society, one must possess the skills to utilize technology to complete both basic and sophisticated tasks.  To this end, students graduating from the LCSD must be able to select and use technology as a means to an identified end.  To achieve this, they must be provided with a variety of opportunities to acquire and hone their skills with computers as well as other technologies throughout their entire K-12 career.

 

TC Action Item  

 

School Year 2002-2003 Goal:

¨        Investigate the feasibility of offering additional technology-rich courses

 

 

Subsection 2.3.4 Assessment

TC Action Item  

 

 

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Section 2.4 Noninstructional Staff Use

Section 2.4.1 Current State

 

The Le Roy Central School District uses the following administrative packages to support its infrastructure.

 

Department

Software Package

Description

Personnel

Business Office

Finance Manager

Payroll, accounting, personnel, and requisitions

Business Administrator, Treasurer, and Accounts Payable

Guidance, Jr/Sr HS, Elementary, Health Office, CSE

School Master for DOS

Student Information System, incl. schedules, grade reporting, organization and maintenance of student demographic data

School Secretaries, Guidance Counselors, Nurses, Principals/Vice Principals, School Psychologists, Teachers

CSE

Part 200

Special Education Management System

Director of CSE, SpEd Teachers, Support Services Personnel

 

All personnel have received training in the applicable software packages.  In addition, these staff members use the applications included in the Microsoft Office Suite to carry out their work.

Section 2.4.2 Desired State:

Five-Year Goal:  The Le Roy Central School District will use a variety of data and data-warehousing mechanisms to manage the district’s operations.  These systems will be compatible with the network and workstation topologies, as well as be robust and secure.  In as much as possible, the systems in use will interact with both the LAN as well as be able to make select data available to parents and other community members. 

 

School Year 2002-2003: 

¨        Investigate the feasibility of a comprehensive student information system which is easier to use and scalable to meet the increasing data demands of the district needs to take place.  This system may include web-based delivery, local and state exam score archiving and manipulation, integrated grading package, use of handhelds for tracking and updating, and portfolio building.

¨        Utilize the current system for attendance.

¨        Create and utilize a system for tracking student discipline.

¨        Create and utilize a system for tracking AIS students and their progress.

 

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Chapter 3: Professional Development

Section 3.1 Staff Development Opportunities

Subsection 3.1.1 Historical Information (1999-2001)

In the spring of 2000, grade level and department teams created three-year technology plans in which goals for technology use were identified and the training necessary to bring those goals to fruition was noted.  The 2000-2001 school year marks the first year of that three-year plan.  Training has taken place when indicated within the individual grade/department level plans through a variety of means:

 

Source

Description

Edutech

Both all day and half-day workshops are offered.  Content includes teacher utility and instructional integration.

LCSD Technology Services Department

Short workshops, usually held before and after school hours, centering on specific technology applications and their use in supporting learning.

Conferences

NYSCATE, IRA, others

Individual/small group training sessions

Scheduled as needed to meet individual, grade level, or department needs.

Community Education classes

Offered in the evenings and free to all LCSD staff.  Emphasis on entry-level computer skills.

 

A database outlining the individual department/grade level technology goals has been developed and teacher participation in training events has been cross referenced with the plans so that each teams' progress toward goals can be monitored.  Current data indicate that only a small percentage of the faculty and staff attend the scheduled workshops held by either Edutech or in-house staff.  A following is a breakdown of the participation in professional development opportunities for the 1999-2002 school years.

School Year

Type of Training

Staff attending

Staff wait-listed

No. of workshops

Dif. workshops

July, 1999-June, 2000

Edutech classes/work-shops

28

5

81

33

July, 2000-January, 2001

Edutech classes/work-shops

19

8

53

21

September, 2000-June, 2001

In-house staff development classes

37

N/A

73

19

September, 2000-June, 2001

“By-request” grade level training

29

N/A

37

14

 

Number of staff attending only Edutech workshops

22

Number of staff attending only in-house workshops (not counting by-request training opportunities)

16

Number of staff attending both

46

Total

84

 

School Year

Type of Training

Staff attending

Staff wait-listed

No. of workshops

Dif. workshops

January, 2001-August, 2001

Edutech classes/work-shops

15

0

33

14

September, 2001-June, 2002

In-house staff development classes

25

N/A

40

13

 

Number of staff attending only Edutech workshops

8

Number of staff attending only in-house workshops (not counting by-request training opportunities)

18

Number of staff attending both

5

Total

31

*Note: these numbers do not reflect grade/department level training, ongoing training (meets weekly-monthly), or the March 02 Superintendents Conference Day

Conclusion:  The current staff development offerings do not meet the needs of the entire LCSD staff.  Alternative opportunities for professional development need to be put in place so that more staff members will increase their ability to use technology.

 

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Subsection 3.1.2 Current State:

Training opportunities are available through a variety of venues for faculty and staff of the LCSD (In-house, Edutech, online).  Training includes both specific application training as well as integration techniques.  There is no requirement for staff to participate in specific technology training although any efforts to do so are supported and encouraged.  At the start of the school year, half-day staff development workshops were offered at the secondary level.  Teachers could sign up a head of time and substitute teachers were hired to relieve the teachers of their teaching duties so that they may attend training.  In addition, elementary staff attend training using the half-day model. Typically, the subject of this training is based on individual grade level needs.  Before and after school workshops are also held at the elementary level.

Teach To The Future:  This program was developed by Intel and made available through a collaboration between WFL and GV BOCES.  One teacher from LCSD was selected to take on the role of Master Teacher for the district.  In addition, ten other teachers have volunteered as Participating Teachers.  The goal of the program is to facilitate the development of technology-rich units of study which can be utilized in any classroom.  Implementation of this program began in the Summer of 2002.

 

Subsection 3.1.3 Desired State:

 

In following one of the basic assumptions of technology use, that teachers who enjoy mastery of technology use technology, it is essential that teachers be provided with ongoing, high quality staff development opportunities.  Over the years, staff development experts have learned a few things about effective staff development models:

 

·        In order to have the most pronounced effect, training should be in response to an individual's specific needs

·        Training should take place in a comfortable setting without time and space restrictions

·        Individuals should be given clear instruction that is appropriately paced

·        There should be adequate opportunities to practice what is being learned

·        Assistance and support should be readily available when needed both during and after the training

·        Adults, like children, learn in different ways and should therefore, be provided with instruction in a variety of formats

 

It is for these reasons then, that the staff development program of any school district be multifaceted.  In addition to the previously mentioned sources of training, efforts will be made to explore alternative training methods including the development and maintenance of an in-house training library. This library will contain both manuals and interactive training media.  Teachers will be encouraged to access these materials when necessary.  Training manuals and tutorials will also be made available through the district's web site. 

Other potential sources of professional development include the development of in-house technology mentors. These individuals may be recruited from the District’s Teach To The Future Program.  Individuals agreeing to be technology mentors will serve as turnkey trainers for workshops and staff development days as well as work one-on-one with selected staff members. 

Another source of training and assistance can be found within the student body itself. Many of the students at Le Roy Central School District possess key skills in particular computer applications.  Seniors in the district are required to perform a certain amount of community service.  It is anticipated that in the future some of these students may be willing to act as trainers to either the teachers or even younger students themselves.

 

TC Action Item  

 

 

Source

Description

Edutech

Both all day and half-day workshops are offered.  Content includes teacher utility and instructional integration.

LCSD Technology Services Department

·          Short workshops centering on specific technology applications and their use in supporting learning.

·          Half day training with planned follow-up.

Conferences

NYSCATE, IRA, others

Individual/small group training sessions

Scheduled as needed to meet individual, grade level, or department needs.

Community Education classes

Offered in the evenings and free to all LCSD staff.  Emphasis on entry-level computer skills.

Online training materials and text-based manuals

Available via the Technology Services Department "lending library".

Technology Mentors

1:1 technology mentoring

On-demand assistance by Technology Services Department staff

In-class, small group

Selected students.

Working with teachers and students in the classroom setting.

 

 

Subsection 3.1.4 Assessment

            Evidence of the effectiveness of the district’s staff development plan will be gathered from a variety of sources.  First, specific data about the number and type of workshops attended by faculty will be maintained.  Anecdotal records will be kept correlating attendance at training sessions with evidence of classroom application.  Next, teachers will be encouraged to share their experiences and successes through a number of venues including staff development days, write-ups in the district’s monthly technology newsletter, Tech Talk, public displays throughout the district, as well as on the district web site.

 

 

                                                                            

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Chapter 4: Infrastructure and Inventory

Section 4.1 Infrastructure

 

Subsection 4.1.1 Historical Information (2000-2002)

Growing demands for increased speed and connectivity have made it necessary to deem the current wiring scheme inadequate.  Plans are underway to rewire the remaining portions of the district using category 5 enhanced copper cabling and attaching all workstations to the Ethernet network.  This rewiring will take place in anticipation of the renovation project currently underway.  This district is building a new high school.  The existing structure will become the K-6 building.  Current high school classrooms, with only one Token Ring drop, will house the intermediate students.  Current classroom set ups for these grades include five networked computers and one networked printer.  It is therefore imperative, that the existing building be rewired so as to support future classroom shifts.

 

 

Timeline:

 

Phase

CompleteYear

Location of New Cable

1.

Summer 2001

2nd & 3rd floors High School

Revised:1-0: Postponed pending building project renovation

2.

Summer 2002

1st floor Wolcott Street School

3.

Summer 2003

Lapp Wing, 1st floor High School

 

The Le Roy Central School District is currently maintaining a dual architecture topology.  Originally, the entire district was wired with Type 3 copper wiring using Token Ring technology.  Three years ago, a large capital project provided monies to begin rewiring some of the key areas throughout both buildings using category five, twisted pair copper cabling and switching to an Ethernet network.  As of the 2000-2001 school year, the second and third floors of the Wolcott Street building, the elementary computer lab, the high school computer labs (business, general use, and CAD) and a selected classroom in the high school were connected to this network. 

 

Subsection 4.1.2 Current State

There is a 24-strand fiber backbone linking the file servers to a switching "station" in room 109 of the high school and to one in the art room at the elementary server.  A 24-strand fiber cable also links the main district buildings to the library.  Switches are located on the second floor of the Wolcott Street building and in room 214 of the high school.  All Ethernet lines are run from these switches.  Token ring switches are also located in the art room and serve the needs of the first floor of the Wolcott Street building.  All Token Ring lines in the high school are run from the closet located in room 109 of the high school.

The district maintains five file servers: an instructional server, which serves both the elementary and high school student and staff needs, an administrative server, which stores administrative user files, School Master, a Mandarin server, a Finance Manager server which is dedicated to the business office use, and a Part 200 server, dedicated to the Part 200 programming needs of the Special Education Department.

Maintenance of the system is contracted with Edutech, a division of our BOCES system. This service provides routine maintenance of the file servers and workstations.  In addition, a full time network administrator (Summer 2002), three lab assistants, and the Director of Technology support the network and individual workstations.

 

Subsection 4.1.3 Desired State

 

TBD pending consultation with network administrator

 

 

Section 4.2  Hardware, Software, & Peripherals

 

Subsection 4.2.1 Standardization Strategy

 

In order to provide adequate access to familiar technology throughout our district and support it in a cost-effective manner, standardization of hardware and software is necessary. On the other hand, total standardization is neither practical nor conducive to creative growth. Therefore, Le Roy Central School District employs a balanced strategy which standardizes many of the core capabilities about one or two hardware and software options, while allowing for some unique applications and “non-standard" technology options for those with unique needs.

 

All new hardware purchases will meet these minimum standard requirements as applicable:

1.      Must be networkable

2.      Must be able to run standard software platforms

3.      Must meet needs of AV requirements (i.e. laser disc players must come equipped with        bar code reader, televisions must be cable ready, etc.)

4.      Purchasing will include all projected costs (i.e. training, networking, upgrading)

 

Standards will be determined by:

     1. Support - BOCES, vendors, Local skills and availability.

     2. Maintenance costs and availability

     3. Training needs and costs

 

A. Platforms

 

All networked computers will run a Windows operating system and be networked using the Novell networking solution.  The version of Windows will be determined by availability although existing operating systems will be taken into account when adding new workstations to areas with existing units.

 

B. Peripherals

 

The standardization rationale on all peripherals has been to purchase like equipment, using BOCES recommendation for brand name and models. There are three major reasons for this: 1) Repairs are easier when dealing with like equipment, 2) Support for like equipment is dealt with in a quicker, smoother manner, 3) Consumable materials such as ribbon and ink cartridges can be purchased at a greater discount when ordering quantities.

 

 

TC Action Item  

  

Need Recommendations for printers, other peripherals

 

C. Software

 

Word processing, database, spreadsheet and presentation programs are being standardized throughout the District. The software of choice will be: Microsoft Office Suite including: Word, Access, Excel and PowerPoint, Microsoft Publisher, Internet Explorer, Inspiration, Photo Editor, and HyperStudio. Other packages supported are Microsoft Works and Pagemaker.

 

There are two major points behind this standardization rationale:

 

1) Support for like software packages throughout the District will be easier and faster, and hopefully more reliable. When several people are using the same package, an internal "users group" is formed. This creates an internal resource of knowledge about the product, allowing for greater productivity.

 

2) These software packages were chosen by observation and recommendation of BOCES and other school districts.

 

When feasible, software standardization across versions will also take place although it is recognized that it is virtually impossible to standardize all machines with the larger, more expensive programs.

 

 

Subsection 4.2.2 Hardware & Peripherals, Current State

 

The following reflects the inventory of computers and peripherals located at Le Roy Central School District.

 

Item

Number

Location

Notes

Computer workstations

175

Jr/Sr. High: (instructional) located in 5 computer labs, 1 English classroom lab, and 1/classroom.

With the exception of a few IBM & Compaq laptops, all workstations are HP Vectra models.

 

11

Jr/Sr. High: administrative

 

 

226

Elementary (instructional) located in one computer lab and 5/classroom

 

 

10

Elementary: administrative

 

 

14

Library

 

 

5

Business office

 

Total 

441

Printers

136

HS: 1:1 computer to printer/classroom, ES: 5:1 computer to printer/classroom

Offices, etc.

Primarily HP DeskJet printers with a few laser printers (n=14).

Infocus projectors

10

WSS and Jr/Sr. HS.  Available for teacher use.

 

Digital cameras

8

WSS (5), Library (1) and Jr/Sr. HS (2).  Available for teacher use.

Sony Mavica

Scanners

5

WSS lab, HS lab, HS English lab, 6th grade classroom, CAD lab

HP Scanjet, various models

Smartboard

3

WSS lab, HS Social Studies and English classrooms.

 

CD Writer

3

HS English lab, CAD lab, Tech coordinator’s office

 

 

 

Notes: All workstations are connected to the network and have Internet access.  The oldest model in the district contains a 5/100 processor.  The majority of these machines are located in the library and as one of five workstations in the elementary classrooms.  The newest models, purchased during the 2000-2001 school year, have Pentium III, 750 MgHz processors.  These machines are located in the HS general use and business computer labs, miscellaneous classrooms throughout this building, and in the 4-6 grade classrooms.

 

Subsection 4.2.3 Hardware & Peripherals, Desired State

 

In order to develop and hone their abilities to utilize technology students also must have access to the appropriate tools.  Because of time constraints imposed by school day schedules and the fact that they must be shared by a large number of individuals, computer lab configurations do not currently meet the educational needs of the students of this district. At this time (SY 2002-2003), only one computer lab is available at the elementary school and one at the high school.  These two labs must be shared by the seven hundred, fifty students at the elementary and approximately eight hundred students at the Jr./Sr. High School, respectively.

District/building renovations taking place in the 2002-2003 school year enhance the need to increase the number of available workstations at the elementary school.  Once the move is made, current lab configurations will be insufficient to meet the growing computing demands of the students at the elementary school.  Conversations will  need to take place between the grade level teachers to determine their anticipated computing needs and plans will need to be formulated to acquire the necessary equipment.  The feasibility of mobile computing units must also be investigated.  Currently, the high school science department has a mobile computer lab consisting of twenty-five laptop computers attached to a wireless network.  This configuration has proved to be beneficial in providing high school science students with the necessary access to computing devices.

The same can be held true for the Jr./Sr. high building.  Currently, every classroom has one computer with the exception of the special education and English departments.  The Jr. High resource room has four computers and the Sr. High resource room has six.  The seventh, ninth, and twelfth grade English classrooms have three, five, and twenty-three computers, respectively.  Again, conversations need to take place between the involved parties so that technology needs match use and availability. 

Both hardware and peripherals should be readily available to staff to support their instruction.  As is often the case, when technology availability is reduced to a “place” (i.e. it’s only available in a computer lab) or a time, then the use of technology remains an event, something that the teachers “do”.  It is the intent of the district technology plan to make a variety of technological devices available to all of the staff, all of the time.  When this is accomplished, then the full use of technology as an integral part of learning and instruction can be achieved.  Anything less reduces it to being an exception rather than the norm.

 

Subsection 4.2.4 Software, Current State

 

As has been described previously in this document, most workstations across the district contain a standardized set of applications. These applications have been deemed by the technology committee as appropriate for all grade levels for a variety of instructional purposes and include:

 

Workstations

Application

Availability

All district workstations

MS Office (97/2000), Internet Explorer, Photo Editor

Current

All instructional workstations 3-12, 1 each K-2

Inspiration

Current

Workstations K-3

Kidspiration

2001-2002

All workstations 4-12, 1 each K-4

MS Publisher

2001-2002

One workstation/classroom

GradeQuick

2001-2002

All instructional workstations 4-12

Hyperstudio

2001-2002

All instructional workstations K-3

KidPix Studio Deluxe

Current

All instructional workstations

Encarta

2001-2002

 

In addition, other titles are available throughout the district.  These titles have been purchased and placed on machines as a result of identified curricular needs.  A complete inventory of all software titles is maintained by the Technology Services Department. 

 

Subsection 4.2.5 Software, Desired State

There is a need to complete the standardization profile of instructional workstations.  Areas of acquisition are noted in the previous table.  In addition, plans are in place by various grade levels to investigate the availability of software which is aligned to the curriculum.  This evaluation is ongoing and will be facilitated through the Technology Services Department following the district software preview and purchasing guidelines.

 

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Chapter 5: Acquisition

Section 5.1 Acquisition Strategy

 

A.               New Acquisition

 

New hardware requests will be processed through the department. It is our intention to replace equipment according to the usability level for the user.   It is the district’s intention to make the most up-to-date equipment available for student use.  New equipment purchases will be determined by the age and capacity of the user’s existing machine, the availability of funds, and the need to replace equipment in a systematic fashion so as to avoid the possibility of excessive equipment replacement in a given school year. 

Replacement of larger quantities of units, such as an entire lab, will be based upon the need to update and the condition of the existing machines. A cycle of lab replacement should be established to protect the District against obsolescence.  Currently, the district’s budget reflects the purchase of a number of workstations every year.  If divided into a five-year replacement cycle, it is anticipated that the district will need to replace approximately 20% of its workstations in a given year.

            Given the current inventory numbers, this means that the district should anticipate the replacement of approximately 100 machines/year. 

 

B.               Upgrade Strategy

 

Older equipment will be recycled when feasible. This equipment will be delivered in operating condition and be deemed suitable for the needs of the person making the request. Computer and technical equipment will continue to be used by different people in the district, as long as it meets minimum usability level. At a time when there is no use for the equipment in the district, the equipment will be returned to Edutech for proper disposal.

 

C.               Software

           

            A software preview and purchasing policy was created during the 2000-2001 school year.  It is required that all software be previewed and deemed appropriate prior to purchase.  Previewing of software is coordinated through the Technology Services Department. During the preview process, teachers complete a form commenting of the perceived use of the given application.  Once purchased, there is the expectation that the teacher will follow up the purchase by adding integration experiences to the database of exemplars.  (See Appendix B for software evaluation form.)

 

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Section 5.2 Budget

 

Two types of expenditures are included in the yearly technology budget, those which are aidable through the New York State Education Department and those which are not.  Purchases and other expenditures made through the Edutech system are aidable through a number of different Cosers.  Because of the availability of aid the majority of purchases are made through this system. 

Each year the technology budget is developed through a determination of the projected needs of the faculty and staff, (as delineated in the grade level/department technology goals), the current Edutech support charges, and the anticipated recurring costs of the District’s instructional technology program.  Included in the budget are the estimated costs of replacement workstations, personnel costs for community education classes and evening computer hours, and monies for additional staff development.

 

 

Budget Year

Edutech Support Charges

Aidable Purchases

Nonaidable Purchases/Other Expenses

Total

2001-2002

$ 208,000

$ 158,000

$ 45,000

$ 411,000

2002-2003

$218,400

$158,000

$ 45,000

$421,400

2003-2004

$229,320

$158,000

$ 45,000

$432,320

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Appendices

Appendix A. Reality Based Planning Model

Appendix B. Software Purchasing Policy

Appendix C. District Acceptable Use Policy

Appendix D. District Web Policy

Appendix E. Technology Benchmarks and Objectives


Appendix A. Reality Based Planning Model

Assessment

            The Assessment evaluated the teacher in three areas: Skill, Attitude and Integration.  These areas are defined as:

 

Skill                                          Ability to use software and problem solve obstacles.  Understanding of the mechanics of computing, hardware and software.                  

 

Attitude                                    Opinions and attitudes about the place of technology in human life, especially the classroom.  Willingness to learn, adopt and master technology.

 

Integration                                Degree to which the individual successfully integrates technology into curriculum.

 

The Assessment instrument was developed by the Director of Technology and calibrated by giving the Assessment to individuals with whom the Director was very familiar.  The Assessment is 98 questions true/false type questions.  Teachers were instructed to answer honestly, but to skip any questions they found confusing or irritating.  They were told that the Assessments would be scored as a group, and they did not need to sign their name.

 

            The Assessments were scored using a Rubric developed by the Director of Technology at the time, Clare Dygert.

 

Reality Based Technology Planning

 

Skills

 

Attitude

 

Integration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non User                     0-10

 

-Very low skills, unable to logon to network without assistance.                       Can not use Email.  Very minimal awareness of technology available.  Can not perform simple tasks such as printing a document or retrieving email without help.                       0 - 5

 

Demonstrates fear or mistrust of technology.                        0 - 5

 

None                                                       0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Novice User   12-20

 

Can logon to system, retrieve and send email, create a word processing document, and print a document.  Does not accurately report problems.          6-10

 

Believes technology is very confusing or very complicated.  Feels uncomfortable using technology with students.  Willing to learn more about technology.          6-10

 

None                                                       0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accomplished User  21-36

 

Uses more than one tool software package with ease.  Can use advanced features with at least one (ex: mail merge).  Uses technology with students.  Able to assist students in use of tool software.  Able to report problems accurately.  11-15

 

Enjoys using technology.  Computer Hobbyist         11-15

 

Beginning to use Internet or CDs to reinforce some lessons.  Uses the computer lab for one or two lessons/units a year.                 1-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Master User              37-55

 

Uses tool software and peripherals with ease.  Acts as a resource to friends, staff and students.  Able to correct simple problems.  Actively seeks new software to learn.     16-20

 

Enthusiastic about the uses of technology in school. Frequently attends workshops and conferences dealing with school technology.            16-20

 

50% of units/lessons have been changed due to the use of technology.  Uses Webquests or other participatory web projects.  7-15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adept User                      56-75

 

Teaches others to use software.  Installs software and peripherals.  System Administrator. Knowledge of network problems and solutions.                         21-25

 

Can develop new uses for technology in school. Enthusiastic to the point of making technology one's career.                       21-25

 

100% of units/lessons have changed due to the use of technology.  Designs websites, software, lessons used by other teachers and students.  16-25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            The Team's scores were averaged, to give a score for the entire team.

           

Evaluation and Planning

            During the second meeting with the team, the results of the Assessment were shared as well as the characteristics of user levels.

 

 

User Stages and Characteristics

 

Non-user                      Has no or very minimal understanding of information technology.  Indicates no interest in increasing skills or adopting technology for his classes.  May exhibit fear or mistrust of technology. 

 

Novice                         Can log on to system and use tool software to accomplish tasks like writing a memo or letter.  Finds screens confusing or overly complicated.  When outcomes are not as expect, user is unsure of how to proceed.  Frequently experiences outcomes that are not expected.  Uses technology to automate some tasks such as letters home to parents, reports, etc.  Would feel uncomfortable using technology with a class, but might give it a try with assistance.

 

Accomplished User      Uses tool software with ease.  Can accurately report problems to system administrator.  Uses technology regularly with class to present information, prepare assignments.  Enjoys using the Internet and can usually find useful sites.  Can help students with the use of tool software.  Generally feels positive about technology and might think of it as a hobby.

 

Master User                 Uses tool software and peripherals such as scanner, digital camera, projects with great ease.  Integrates technology into curriculum.  Acts as a resource to friends, other staff members and students in the area of technology. Able to correct simple problems.  Can successfully download from the internet and install software or plug ins.  Actively seeks new software or ways technology can be used in the classroom.

 

Adept User                  Highly trained.  Able to solve almost all problems.  Possesses system wide knowledge of technology.  System Administrator.  Able to train other trainers.

 

 

            Teachers were told that the goal of the planning process was to move their team one level in three years. So, if the team scored overall as "Accomplished" users, the goal would be to move them to "Master" level users in three years.  The way this will be accomplished is by having the teachers create projects that either prepared them for the next level of work, or more typically, included  characteristics of users of the higher level.  The understanding is that the way we become more advanced in our skills is by doing things that those who are more advanced do.

 

                Teachers were presented with the Planning Form document and instructed to create projects for themselves that would fill the next three years.  Projects might last one, two or three years.  Projects might be one of three types: skill improvement projects, where teachers improve their ability to use technology through training experiences; Tool projects where teachers create tools using technology that reduce the mundane aspects of their jobs; and Curriculum Integration projects that use technology to positively impact the quality of instruction in their classrooms.

 

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Appendix B. Software Purchasing Policy.

Le Roy Central School District

Technology Services Department

 

 

 

 
Software Purchasing Procedure

All software and hardware purchases will align themselves with the instructional goals and objectives of the Le Roy Central School District.  Prior to purchase, software will be previewed by the classroom teacher(s) and evaluated for educational applicability and appropriateness.  In addition, software must be deemed compatible with the individual workstation as well as the entire LCSD computer network. In order to assure this, the following procedure must be followed:

 

1.      Teacher identifies a particular piece of software that may be suitable for purchase OR teacher identifies instructional need and, working with the Technology Coordinator, locates software which may be appropriate.

2.      This information is communicated to the Technology Coordinator via the Tech Help Form. The coordinator will then coordinate the ordering of the software for preview.  If possible, the source of the software should also be given to the coordinator when making the request.

3.      Software is ordered for preview.

4.      Software is loaded on appropriate machines and evaluation forms are completed (Form A).

5.      Completed evaluations are then returned to the Technology Coordinator.  These evaluations should include the purchasing recommendations as well as the location of the computers on which the program is to be installed.  Note: Even if software is deemed inappropriate for purchase, record of the evaluation will be kept on file.

6.      Pending available funds, software being recommended for purchase will be ordered. 

 

Follow Up

Approximately one year after the date of purchase and install, teachers will be asked to formally reflect upon the use of a given software or technology (Form B).  The purpose of this reflection is twofold. First, it attempts to correlate the use of a given technology with some degree of student achievement. Second, in sharing proven practices, it is the hope of the LCSD Technology Services Department to begin to identify and record exemplary classroom uses of technology.  These practices will then be shared with other teachers via the District web site.  Where appropriate, student work should be submitted for inclusion in this collection. 


Le Roy Central School District

Technology Services Department

 

Software Evaluation

Form A

 
Evaluator(s): _____________________________________      Date: _________

Software Title: ____________________________________  Version: ________

Publisher: ________________________________________________________

Subject Area: _____________________________________________________

System Requirements (usually found on the box):

MB RAM: ______ Hard Drive space(MB): _____  Processor speed(MgHz): ____

Operating System (Win 95, Win 98, Win NT, etc.): ________________________

 


Evaluation:

1.      What curricular area does this support? ___________________________________

2.      What standards/performance indicators are addressed by the use of this software/hardware? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. How will it be used? (Circle all that apply)

Direct Instruction

Remediation/Reinforcement

Enrichment

Assessment

Simulation

Tutorial

Problem Solving

Problem Solving

Critical Thinking

Other: ________________________________________________________________

 

4. Using the Program:

 

Disagree                Agree

The instructions are clear

1       2        3        4        5  

The content is organized in a logical manner.

1       2        3        4        5  

The content and tasks are appropriate for the intended grade level.

1       2        3        4        5  

a variety of media is used to enhance the content (i.e. video, sound, pictures).

1       2        3        4        5  

 

 

5. Documentation:

 

Disagree                Agree

The program comes with easy to understand documentation.

1       2        3        4        5  

Online help is available or is a phone number listed for technical support.

1       2        3        4        5  

Recommendations for classroom instruction are included.

1       2        3        4        5  

A tutorial is provided.

1       2        3        4        5  

 

 

7.      Other Comments:

 

 

 

 


Recommendations:

            I recommend that this software be purchased.

·        Number of licenses: ______________________

·        Location of computers: ____________________

·        Source of funds: _________________________

I do recommend that this software NOT be purchased for the following reasons:

 

 

 

 

 

Signed: ________________________________________    Date: __________

 

Please return completed form to Debby Baker.


Le Roy Central School District

Technology Services Department

 

Technology Follow Up

Form B

 
Name: __________________________________________     Date: _________

Software Title: ____________________________________    Version: _______

Subject Area: _____________________________________________________

1.      How did you use the software?

 

 

 

2.      What were the students' responses?

 

 

 

 

3.      Please reflect on the ease of use.

 

 

 

 

4.      How would you recommend that others use the software?

 

 

 

 

5. Briefly describe (and submit) student work samples (where applicable).

 

 

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Le Roy Central School District

 

Internet USE PRoCedure

 

The following items are to help establish reasonable precautions for Internet use.

 

1.             Each student or staff member who is granted access privileges will participate in an Internet orientation, provided by the Le Roy Central School District, pertaining to the acceptable use of the network as stated in the Internet Acceptable Use Policy.

 

2.             Every parent and student will receive a copy of the Internet Acceptable Use Policy and Agreement.

 

3.             All parties using the Internet with school district equipment must sign the Internet Acceptable Use Agreement.

 

4.             Students who have not completed the Internet Acceptable Use Agreement will not be allowed to use computers for Internet use.

 

5.             Attempts to login to the Internet as a system administrator will result in cancellation of user privileges and/or appropriate legal action.

 

6.             Staff development opportunities will be provided so that district personnel are proficient in using the Internet for instructional purposes and are aware of issues related to child safety.

 

7.             Adequate supervision will be provided to students in the school setting to prevent unauthorized access to the Internet.

 

8.             Annual notice to parents of the potential concern about access on the Internet to inappropriate materials and issues of child safety will be included in the August “School Notes” column.

 

9.             Parents will be given the opportunity to request that their child not be allowed access to the Internet.

 

10.        Parents or guardians have sole responsibility for supervising access to the Internet from the home.

 


Le Roy Central School District

Board of Education Policy

 

Internet Acceptable Use

 

Introduction

 

The Board of Education recognizes that Internet access offers vast, diverse and unique resources to both students and staff.  The District is pleased to provide this service to promote educational excellence in schools by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication.

 

Internet Use

 

The Internet is an electronic highway connecting thousands of computers and millions of individual subscribers all over the world.  Students and staff have access to:

 

1.             Information and news from educational, governmental and commercial resources around the world;

2.             The Library of Congress Catalog, other library catalogs, and ERIC (a large collection of relevant information to educators and students);

3.             Newsgroups on a variety of educationally related topics;

4.             Electronic mail communication with people throughout the global community; and

5.             Graphics and other multimedia resources for reports and projects.

 

With Internet access to computers and people all over the world comes the availability also of materials that may not be considered to be of educational value in the context of the school setting.  The Le Roy Central School District has taken reasonable precautions to restrict access to controversial materials.  Our network utilizes a system designed to filter out Internet-based information that would be considered inappropriate for students.  However, on a global network it is impossible to control all materials and an industrious user may discover controversial information.  The Le Roy Central School District firmly believes that the valuable information and interaction available on this worldwide network far outweighs the possibility that users may access material which is not consistent with the educational goals of the District.

 

Internet access is coordinated through a complex association of government agencies, and regional and state networks.  In addition, the smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of the end users who must adhere to strict guidelines.  These guidelines emphasize responsibility of students and staff to utilize the network in an efficient, ethical and legal manner.  If a Le Roy Central School District user violates any of the provisions of this document, appropriate disciplinary actions will be taken and access privileges will be terminated at the discretion of the appropriate building principal.

 

Terms and Conditions of Use

 

All parties using the Internet with school district must sign an agreement for acceptable use of the Internet.

 

1.           Acceptable Use.  District Internet use must be in support of education and research, and be consistent with the educational objectives of the Le Roy Central School District.  Use of other organizations’ networks or computing resources must comply with the rules appropriate for those networks.  The following acts are prohibited when using LeRoy Central School District’s Internet access:

 

a.       Transmission of material in violation of any federal or state regulation.

b.      Criminal speech or activity, such as, threats to the President, instructions on breaking into computer systems, child pornography, drug dealing, purchase of alcohol and gang activities.

c.      Speech and actions that are inappropriate in an educational setting or violate district policy, such as:

1)     Inappropriate language – obscene, profane, lewd, vulgar, rude, disrespectful, threatening, or inflammatory language; harassment; personal attacks, including prejudicial or discriminatory attack; or false or defamatory material about a person or organization.

2)     Dangerous information – information, which if acted upon, could cause damage and present a danger of disruption.

3)     Violations of privacy and personal safety – revealing personal information about one’s self or others, agreeing to meet with someone from an on-line contact, and failing to disclose to the appropriate staff member any message received that is inappropriate or makes one feel uncomfortable.

4)     Copyright infringement or plagiarism.

5)     Use of or allowing to use another person’s account.

 

d.      Offering or providing products or services through District Internet access, as well as purchasing products or services except when authorized.  The District is not responsible for financial obligations arising from the unauthorized use of the system.

e.      Engaging in fund-raising, partisan politics and religious activities.

 

2.           Privileges.  The use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right.  Inappropriate use may result in a cancellation of those privileges.  Each student or staff member who is granted access privileges will participate in an Internet orientation, provided by the Le Roy Central School District, pertaining to the acceptable use of the network as stated in this document.  Building administrators will deem what is inappropriate use.  The administration, faculty, and staff of the Le Roy Central School District may request the Superintendent or his/her designee to deny, revoke, or suspend specific access privileges.

 

3.           Network Etiquette.  Le Roy Central students and staff are expected to abide by the generally accepted rules of network etiquette.  These include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

a.       Be polite.  Do not get abusive in your messages to others.

b.      Use appropriate language.  Do not swear, use vulgarities or any other inappropriate language.

c.      Protect your privacy.  Do not reveal your own personal addresses, phone numbers or password or those of students or colleagues.

d.      Use the network in such a way that your use would not disrupt the operation of the network for others.  This includes, but is not limited to the downloading of games, executable files, and/or any Internet site or portion of a site deemed inappropriate by the supervising teacher for the class level, class period, or time of general unstructured lab use.

e.      Observe copyright laws.  All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be the property of the creator.

 

4.           Disclaimer of Loss.  The Le Roy Central School District makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the service it is providing.  The Le Roy Central School District will not be responsible for any damages the user may suffer.  These include, but are not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, nondeliveries, misdeliveries, or service interruptions caused by negligence or the user’s errors or omissions.  Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at the user’s own risk.  The Le Roy Central School District specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its Internet services.

 

5.           Security.  Security on any computer system is a high priority, especially when the system involves many users.  If the user feels a security problem can be identified, the user must notify the appropriate administrator.  The user should not demonstrate the problem to other users.  Attempts to login to the Internet as a system administrator will result in cancellation of user privileges.  Any user identified as a security risk or having a history of problems with other computer systems may be denied access to the Internet.

 

6.           Privacy.  Electronic mail and/or user files are not guaranteed to be private.  People who operate the system may have access to all mail.  Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities may be reported to the authorities.  E-mail accounts are only available to employees of the LCSD. 

 

7.           Vandalism.  Vandalism may result in cancellation of privileges or other disciplinary action.  Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data of another user, Internet or any agencies or other networks that are connected to any of the Internet backbones.  This includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or creation of computer viruses or the physical damage of computing and networking equipment.

 

8.           Responsibility.  If the user discovers an inappropriate Internet site, he or she must report it immediately to the adult individual in charge and not reveal it to any other user.

 

 


Le Roy Central School District

Acceptable Use Policy

 

Parent or Guardian Acknowledgement

As the parent or guardian of this student, I have read this Internet Acceptable Use Agreement.  I understand that this access is designed for educational purposes.  The Le Roy Central School District has taken reasonable precautions to limit access to controversial material.  However, I also recognize it is impossible for the Le Roy Central School District to restrict access to all controversial materials, and I will not hold the district responsible for materials acquired on the network.   Further, I accept full responsibility for supervision if and when my child's use of the district's Internet access is not in a school setting.  I hereby give permission for my child to have Internet Access and certify that the information contained on this form is correct.

Parent or Guardian’s Name (please print): __________________________________________________

Parent or Guardian's Signature:   __________________________________________________

Student Name: ______________________________________

Date:   ___________________________

 

 

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Date School Received:  ________________________
LE ROY CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT


Appendix D: District Web Policy

 

To be added after BOE approval.

School year: 2002-2003.

 

 

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Le Roy Central School District

Technology Goals and Benchmarks

Students in grades 9-12 will:

Area

Objective

Application

Research

  • Plan and perform complex searches using more than one electronic source

9th grd: SS

10th grd: English, Anne Frank project

11th grd: English, Great Gatsby

12th grade: English

 

 

 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts  

  • Use file management and organization to manage and maintain computer files

9th grade: SS

10th grd: English, Anne Frank project

12th grd: English, ongoing

  • Select technology appropriate for a particular use.

10th grd: English, graphic organizers

 

 

 

Social/Ethical Issues

  • Practice copyright laws

10th grd: English, Anne Frank project/bibliography

 

  • Evaluate information and its sources critically and incorporate selected information into his/her knowledgebase and value system

 

 

 

 

Productivity

  • Produce documents incorporating the more advanced features of word processing, spreadsheets, and /or database software.

9th grd: SS, Medieval newspapers

12th grd: English, Titanic newspapers

Grd 10-12: Computer Applications

  • Use spreadsheets to calculate and manipulate numerical information

Grd 10-12: Computer Applications

Grd 10-12: Accounting

  • Construct and manipulate databases to organize information.

Grd 10-12: Computer Applications

 

 

 

Problem Solving and Decision Making

·         Use technology to investigate and/or solve problems.

9th grd: Earth Science

11-12 grd: Chemistry & Physics (probeware)

 

 

 

Communication

  • Create and use multimedia projects in a presentation format to communicate to a specified audience

12th grd: English, final project


 

Students in grades 7-8 will:

Area

Objective

Application

Research

  • Plan and perform searches using more than one electronic source

 

  • Locate and use information from predetermined web sites

8th grd: English (Civil War), SS: Census data

8th grd: H&C, career research

 

 

 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts  

  • Use file management and organization to manage and maintain computer files

7th grd: English

8th grd: English

  • Select technology appropriate for a particular use.

8th grd: Computer 8

 

 

 

Social/Ethical Issues

  • Practice copyright laws

8th grd: English

  • Evaluate information and its sources critically

 

 

 

 

Productivity

  • Produce documents incorporating the more advanced features of word processing

8th grd: English, Civil War newspapers

8th grd: Computer 8

  • Use spreadsheets to calculate and manipulate numerical information

 

  • Construct and manipulate databases to organize information

 

 

 

 

Problem Solving and Decision Making

·                        Use technology to investigate and/or solve problems.

8th grd: H&C, career research

 

 

 

Communication

  • Create and use multimedia projects in a presentation format to communicate to a specified audience

 

7th grd; SS, State project

8th grd: English (Civil War) some students

8th grd: general Science

8th grd: SS, country project

 

 

In grades 5-6, the students will:

Area

Objective

Level

Application

Research

  • Plan and perform simple searches using Internet search engines.

 

  • Reinforce

 

 

6th grd: Egypt & Greece project, 1600-1700 research in LA

  • Use Internet to gather information from a predetermined set of sites using a given set of topics/questions
  • Reinforce

6th grd: Renaissance Webquest

  • Access information from a variety of electronic sources

 

  • Introduce

 

 

 

 

 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts              

  • Use file management and organization to manage and maintain computer files
  • Reinforce

 

5th/6th grd: Keyboarding/word processing instruction

 

  • Troubleshoot simple problems
  • Introduce

 

 

 

 

 

Social/Ethical Issues

  • Practice copyright laws
  • Reinforce

6th grd: Students include bibliographies in projects

  • Evaluate information for validity, reliability
  • Introduce

 

 

 

 

 

Productivity

  • Create multimedia products to convey information
  • Introduce

 

 

 

  • Produce word processed documents
  • Reinforce

5th/6th grd: Keyboarding/word processing instruction

  • Create and use databases
  • Introduce

 

  • Use spreadsheets to calculate and manipulate numerical information
  • Introduce/Reinforce

5th grd: Industry unit

  • Using graphic organizers to help brainstorm ideas, as a prewriting/post reading tool
  • Reinforce

 

 

 

 

 

Problem solving/Decision Making

·   Participate in electronic simulations, includes: Problem solving, decision making, team building, critical thinking

 

·         Introduce

5th grd: Oregon Trail simulation

5th grd: Electronic fieldtrip

6th grd: Pond unit & Medieval studies

 

 

 

 

Communication

·   Use visuals which have been generated electronically to present information

·         Introduce

6th grd: biographies, ancient Egypt unit

 

 

 


 

In grades 3-4, the students will:

Area

Objective

Level

Application

Research

  • Use the Internet to gather information from a predetermined set of sites using a given set of topics/questions
  • Introduce

 

 

  • Internet: Use a simple search engine to perform simple searches
  • Enrichment

 

 

  • Access information from a variety of electronic sources
  • Introduce

 

 

 

 

 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts  

  • Save and access files from the network
  • Introduce

 

· Keyboarding/Word processing instruction

· Drill/practice of math concepts

  • Develop a comfort level/independence with computers in general
  • Reinforce

 

 

 

 

 

Social/Ethical Issues

  • Develop an awareness of copyright issues when using the Internet, electronic resources, other sources
  • Introduce

 

 

 

 

 

Productivity

  • Create simple multimedia presentations
  • Introduce

 

 

  • Use graphic organizers to organizer information
  • Introduce

· brainstorm ideas, as a prewriting/post reading tool,

· 4th grd: Crayfish unit

  • Use spreadsheets to create simple graphs (4th grade)
  • Introduce

·                     To reinforce math concepts

  • Develop word processing skills
  • Introduce

·       Typing stories, poems, spelling words, etc

  • Develop keyboarding skills
  • Introduce

·       Typing stories, poems, spelling words, etc.

 

 

 

 

Problem solving/Decision Making

  • Participate in electronic simulations and other problem-solving activities
  • Enrichment

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

  • Use technology to share information
  • Enrichment

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In grades K-2, the students will:

Area

Objective

K

1

2

Application

Research

  • Use the Internet and other electronic resources to gather simple information.

 

 

I

·      Animal study

 

 

 

 

Foundational Operations, Knowledge and Concepts  

  • Improve mouse skills

I

 

R

 

R

 

·                     Learning centers, independent work

  • Introduce basic computer concepts including use and terminology

I

R

R

 

 

 

 

 

Social/Ethical Issues

  • Promote care and use of computer.

I

R

R

 

 

 

 

 

Productivity

  • Use computer to reinforce skills being taught in classroom.

I

 

R

R

·                     Individual software titles, classroom learning centers

  • Use keyboard to input text

 

I

R

·         2nd grd: letters to Santa

  • Using graphic organizers to organize information

 

I

I

 

  • Use a drawing/paint program to create graphics.

I

R

R