MS Word '97

Part II

I. Creating Columns

In Word 97, any text can be displayed as columns. Lengthy documents, such as newsletters, are easier to read in a column format. Also, when presenting information about several topics, you may want to format your information into columns to make it easier to read and to provide better exposure for each topic.

A. Formatting text into two columns

To have the best presentation for two columns, balance the length of the columns equally.

Formatting two columns

  1. Open your document.
  2. Press ctrl+a to select all text or got to Edit, Select All.
  3. On the Standard toolbar, click the Columns button.
  4. Click the first column, and drag the mouse so that two columns are selected. Release the mouse button.
  5. Position the insertion point at the beginning of a line in the middle of the text.
  6. On the Insert menu, click Break.
  7. Click Column break.
  8. Click OK.

B. Formatting text into three columns

Some documents may require three columns. Newsletters, numerical lists, reading lists, schedules, and weekly assignments are examples of documents that may present better in a three-column format.

Modifying text into three columns

  1. Using the document from the previous lesson, press ctrl+z to return the paragraph to a single column.
  2. On the Format menu, click Columns.
  3. In the Presets area, click Three. Select the Line between and Equal column width options.
  4. Click OK.
  5. Position the insertion point at the beginning of a line one-third of the way down in the first column.
  6. On the Insert menu, click Break.
  7. Click Column break.
  8. Click OK.
  9. Position the insertion point at the beginning of a line halfway down the second column.
  10. On the Insert menu, click Break.
  11. Click Column break.
  12. Click OK.
  13. Save the document with the file name.

Where you divide material into columns depends on the type of document you are creating and how much material you have to divide.

 

II. Inserting tables

Just as columns add visual interest to your document, tables add interest and clarity. Use tables to organize information into a grid made up of cells. Each cell in a table can contain elements such as text, numbers, complex graphics, bulleted lists, numbering, fields, and hanging indents.

You can easily insert tables into your Word 97 document or PowerPoint presentation. For complex calculations and statistical analysis, you may prefer to use Microsoft Excel 97.

Students may see relationships between facts more clearly when the data is in tables. You can use tables to store data and to perform basic math calculations and averages. You can enhance a table with color to emphasize the data and message. You can add a table by using either the Table menu or the Tables and Borders toolbar.

A. Inserting a table with Draw Table

Using Word 97, you can draw a table, determine its boundaries, add distinctive color and varying line styles, and place text horizontally and vertically.

I. Creating a customized table

  1. Open a new document.
  2. On the Table menu, click Draw Table. The Draw Table pen appears on the desktop.
  3. Using the mouse, drag the Draw Table pen diagonally across the screen to draw the outside of the table.
  4. Using the Draw Table pen, draw three vertical and five horizontal lines in the table.
  5. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Eraser button, and erase the three middle horizontal lines by clicking and dragging the eraser across the lines.
  6. On the Table menu, click Select Table.
  7. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Distribute Rows Evenly button to rearrange the horizontal lines.
  8. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Border Color button, select a color, and drag the Draw Table pen across the middle vertical line.
  1. Type Student Name in the top left cell.
  2. On the Tables and Borders toolbar, click the Center Vertically button.
  3. On the Standard toolbar, click the Align Left button, and then click the Align Right button.
  4. Close the document without saving changes.

There are many advantages to being able to create your own table or chart. Using the features on the Tables and Borders toolbar, you can customize your material to fit your exact requirements.

B. Inserting tables with the Table menu

Using Word 97, you can modify the size of the cells in a table. For example, in a seating chart, you may want to have uniform cell sizes, but for a grade roster, you may prefer a chart that lets you customize the cells to fit the assignments better.

Creating a table with the Table menu

  1. On the Table menu, click Insert Table.
  2. Set the number of columns to 4, the number of rows to 3, and the column width to Auto.
  3. Click AutoFormat.
  4. In the Table AutoFormat dialog box, under Formats, click 3D effects 3.
  5. Click OK to close the Table AutoFormat window.
  6. Click OK to close the Insert Table dialog box and insert the table in your document.

 

C. Moving around inside a table

In Word 97, a row in a table is horizontal, and a column is vertical. The following lessons explain how you can move around in a table using the mouse and how to enter text and then copy, paste, and change that text within the table.

Selecting cells

  1. Position the mouse pointer in the lower-left corner of any cell.
  2. Click to select that one cell.
  3. Position the pointer at the start of a row, and click to select that row.
  4. Position the pointer at the top of a column. The mouse pointer will turn into a down arrow. Click to select that column.

You can select adjacent columns and rows by dragging the pointer across the additional cells you want to select.

D. Using shortcut keys

  1. Using the same table from the previous lesson, click in the upper-left cell of your table.
  2. Enter today’s date.
  3. Press the tab key to move to the next cell.
  4. Enter tomorrow’s date.
  5. Position the insertion point in the last cell of the last column.
  6. Press the tab key to add another row.
  7. Press shift+tab to move back one cell.

E. Changing lines inside tables

The standard table may not be sized according to your needs. If the information you enter does not fit into one cell of the column, Word 97 makes the text fit by creating a second line of text. This may not be what you want.

Changing column size to fit your text

  1. Repeat the steps in the "Inserting tables with the Table menu" lesson.
  2. Type the following three lines into your table:
  3. Student Name Class Participation Homework Quizzes

    Dirksen, Jay Anthony 7/10 94% 93%

    Castaneda, Marea Angela 9/10 93% 95%

  4. Position the mouse pointer on the vertical line between the Student Name and Class Participation columns until the pointer becomes this symbol:
  5. Click and drag the vertical line to the right until each name fits on one line.
  6. Position the pointer on the vertical line between the Class Participation and Homework columns.
  1. Click and drag the vertical line to the right until Class Participation fits on one line.
  2. If necessary, repeat this procedure for the Homework and Quizzes columns.
  3. Close this document without saving changes.

III. Adding graphics with shortcut keys

You can easily add symbols to your documents, just by using the keyboard.

Adding symbols to your text

  1. Open a new document.
  2. Type a colon followed by a close parenthesis—:) —and watch what happens. A happy face like this J will appear.
  3. Select the image, and press ctrl+] to increase the point size by one point at a time. Increase the size of the image to 18 points.
  4. Type a colon followed by an open parenthesis—:( —to see what appears.
  5. Close the document without saving changes.

IV. Formatting artistic borders

Using Word 97 you can easily add a border to your class handouts, or create designs that enhance your assignments and engage your students.

Adding decorative page borders

  1. Open a new document.
  2. Type Supply List.
  3. Position the insertion point anywhere in the text. On the Formatting toolbar, click the Center button.
  4. Select the words "Supply List."
  5. In the Font Size box on the Formatting toolbar, type 90. Press enter.
  6. From the Format menu, click Borders and Shading.
  7. Click the Page Border tab.
  8. Click Custom.
  9. Click the Art arrow, and select the apples border from the list.
  10. Click OK.
  11. Close the document without saving changes.


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