Reading Recovery Site Report for the Genesee Valley BOCES Site

Reading Recovery Implementation at Genesee Valley BOCES

In August of 2000, Teacher Leader Annette Brongo was hired by Batavia City School District and Le Roy Central School District to start a new Reading Recovery site within the Genesee Valley BOCES area.  Pat Lockwood, Assistant Superintendent of Instruction at Batavia City School District and James Thompson, Principal at Wolcott Street School in Le Roy were the advocates for starting a new site in order to continue the growth and implementation of Reading Recovery across the area.

Four districts (Batavia City School District, Dansville Central Schools, Le Roy Central Schools, and Warsaw Central Schools) were involved in the first year of the site.  A total of 11 teachers were involved in the program.  Five teachers were in the training class and six participated in continuing professional development.

                In 2001-2002 the Genesee Valley BOCES Site offered a training class to five participants from the following school districts:  Le Roy, Dansville, Warsaw, and Spencerport.   Eight trained teachers participated in continuing contact to maintain their Reading Recovery certifications.  

Table S0 Count Of University Training Centers, States, Sites, Systems, Buildings, Teachers, And Students Participating In Reading Recovery In Genesee Valley BOCES

Entity

n

 

 

  UTCs

1

  Sites

1

  States

1

  Systems

5

  Buildings

6

  Leaders

1

  Teachers

13

  RR Students

111

  Random Sample for RR

100

End-of-Program Status and Percentage Discontinued

Research Question 2: What was the end-of-program status of children served by Reading Recovery? What percentage was successfully discontinued?

Reading Recovery accounts for all children served even if served for only one day. At the end of each child’s series of lessons, a status category is assigned. The five status categories (described in detail in the section describing ‘Study Participants’) are as follows: (a) discontinued, (b) recommended action after a full program of 20 weeks, (c) incomplete program at year-end, (d) moved while being served, and (e) none of the above.

Table 2.1 provides numbers and percentages of children in each status category. A graphic display of percentages of the total number served in each status category is shown in Figure 2.1. Of all children who received even one day of Reading Recovery service 49% were discontinued.  In 2000-2001 our discontinuing rate across the site was 44%.  This data reflects a small increase.

Table 2.1 End-Of-Program Status Of Reading Recovery Children By District

 

End-Of-Program Status

Total

 

Discontinued

Recommended

Incomplete

Moved

None of Above

 

District

n

row %

n

row %

n

row %

n

row %

n

row%

n

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Batavia Central

12

43%

8

29%

7

25%

1

4%

0

0%

28

  Dansville CSD

14

41%

8

24%

11

32%

1

3%

0

0%

34

  Leroy Central

20

61%

8

24%

4

12%

1

3%

0

0%

33

  Spencerport Central SD

5

63%

1

13%

2

25%

0

0%

0

0%

8

  Warsaw CSD

3

38%

2

25%

3

38%

0

0%

0

0%

8

  TOTAL

54

49%

27

24%

27

24%

3

3%

0

0%

111

Note: Any differences between total n in this table and total group in Table 1.1 represent missing data (status).c

 

Children’s programs that are cut short by mobility, insufficient time at the end of the school year, or by rare and extreme circumstances cannot be considered full instructional programs. Therefore, another way to interpret the data may be useful. The number of children who discontinued can also be examined as a percentage of the children who had an opportunity for a full program of 20 or more weeks. Table 2.2 shows that 64% of the children who had an opportunity for a full program were discontinued from Reading Recovery.

 

Table 2.2 Percentage Of Full-Program Reading Recovery Children Who Discontinued

 

 

Full-Program

 

Total

Discontinued

District

n

n

row %

 

 

 

 

  Batavia Central

20

12

60%

  Dansville CSD

26

14

54%

  Leroy Central

28

20

71%

  Spencerport Central SD

6

5

83%

  Warsaw CSD

5

3

60%

  Total

85

54

64%

Note: Full-Program is defined as any child who was either discontinued or received at least 20 weeks of instruction.

 Because the factor of time in the intervention is critical to the efficiency of the implementation, the average length of children’s programs was calculated. Table 2.3 shows the average number of weeks and sessions of Reading Recovery instruction received by children in each of the five status categories. The data show that all students receiving instruction averaged approximately 3 ˝ lessons per week.  This is an issue affecting a child’s progress and ability to make accelerative progress.  Individual buildings along with the teacher leader should look at what is interfering with daily delivery of the service and therefore effective implementation of the program. This data also reveals that recommended and children with incomplete programs had less than 3.5 lessons per week.  These are the children that need the most lessons during their programs.

Table 2.3 Average Number Of Weeks And Sessions Of Reading Recovery Instruction

 

End-Of-Program Status

 

Dis.

Rec.

Inc.

Mov.

N.o.A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weeks

 

 

 

 

 

  n

42

13

22

3

15

  Mean

15.9

20

12.9

10.7

15.7

  Median

15

20

13

8

17

  Minimum

9

20

9

8

3

  Maximum

20

20

17

16

18

Sessions

 

 

 

 

 

  n

42

13

22

3

15

  Mean

56.1

70.5

43.4

35.3

52.3

  Median

56.5

72

45

29

54

  Minimum

26

55

26

29

11

  Maximum

80

76

67

48

63

  Mean Sessions Per Week

3.5

3.5

3.3

3.4

3.3

Note: Mean Sessions per week is the average number of sessions received
per week of instruction for each Reading Recovery child.

          Any differences in n between this table and total group in Table 1.1 represent cases with missing data (weeks or sessions).

 

Progress on Literacy Measures

Research Question 3: What was the progress of the Reading Recovery children on literacy measures?

The Observation Survey is divided into two parts. Part One is the test of text reading. Fall scores and year-end scores were used to examine progress on text reading for three Reading Recovery status categories (children in ‘moved’ and ‘none of the above’ categories were either unavailable for year-end testing or numbers were too small). Random sample children were not tested in the fall. Comparison group children were tested at the end of the year.

Table 3.1 shows the progress of Reading Recovery children and random sample children on text reading. Mean scores and median scores are displayed; mean scores represent the average performance of the group and median scores indicate the point at which 50% of the scores were higher and 50% were lower. A graphic display of the progress made on text reading by all groups is shown in Figure 3.1.

Table 3.1 Progress Of Reading Recovery And Comparison Group Children On Text Reading Level From Fall To Year-End

 

Text Reading Level

Gainb

End-Of-Program Statusa/

Fall

Year-End

 

Student Group

n

median

mean

SD

n

median

mean

SD

n

mean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Discontinued

43

1

0.7

0.8

52

18

17.4

2.9

41

16.9

  Recommended

27

0

0.4

0.8

26

8

7.3

3

26

6.8

  Incomplete

11

1

1

0.9

27

10

10.5

3

11

9.8

  Random Sample

0

0

0

0

100

20

18.1

3.5

0

0

Note: The Random Sample Site Average Band for Text Reading Level is 16.3 - 19.8.

a.       Analysis of progress made by Reading Recovery children excludes those who were in the 'none of above' category and those who 'moved while being served' before their program status could be determined.

b.       Mean gain is based only on children with both fall and year-end scores.

Figure 3.1 Progress Of Reading Recovery And Comparison Group Children On Text Reading Level From Fall To Year-End

      Data in Table 3.1 represent average group performance. It is also important to study the performance of individual children. Therefore, the percentage of individual children who scored at each text reading level at the end of the year was determined. Table 3.2 shows the text levels read successfully by children in Genesee Valley BOCES at the end of grade one.


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